Category Archives: Agile Project Ventures

My journey into Agile Project Management

Forming Habits and Being Agile are not Opposed to Each Other

I follow Jennifer Bridges because she has a great way of simplifying complicated issues while making them doable. I am also a Project Manager that appreciates both Waterfall and Agile Project Management. To be Agile almost seems like it doesn’t go with forming Habits. I recognize that I’m talking about two different things when it comes to habits and Agile thinking, but I see some useful parallels. I think forming habits for success can strengthen one’s ability to be Agile. Scrum, for example, uses a number of “habits” or practices that help the team become Agile in dealing with complex and unpredictable projects. Take a look at Jennifer’s video and consider how forming strong habits can help you become successful, even if your focus is being Agile.

Everything you do influences your performance. Jennifer Bridges, PMP, shows you which work habits propel you to success.

Source: 7 Work Habits You Need to Succeed

Difference Between Agile and Scrum

I found this very helpful post by Erika Flora that is a concise but thoughtful treatment of what you should be thinking when you use the words Agile and Scrum. At least for me, the path isn’t as clear in the reading I have done, until I found this piece. Take a look, you’ll be glad you did!

 

A lot of people use the words Agile and Scrum interchangeably – as though they mean the same thing. They don’t. So what’s the difference between Agile and Scrum? I dig into the differences here, plus a bonus overview of Scrum basics.

Source: What’s the Difference Between Agile and Scrum?

Self-Directed Teams

Jennifer Bridges of  projectmanager.com produces helpful brief videos describing various concepts. This particular video is a great high level overview of setting up self directed teams, which is an art as much as it is a science. Take a look!

With more & more self-directed teams working on projects, you may have to setup or partake in one. So, it’s important to understand self-directed teams.

Source: How to Setup Self-Directed Teams

Think Teamwork has to be in Person?

Distributed teams are an integral part of Project Management and work with Vendors. I appreciate the need to do this part of the job well, even though my natural strengths are to work with people in person. This is a great start to the journey of thinking through how to manage teams that are not located in the same zip code.

Team Tech Assessment for Project Managers | Remote Leadership Institute

How well are your project managers adjusting to the new world of virtual work, telework and remote teams? Two-thirds of capital expenditures are spent on projects and 90% of those projects involve team members who are not co-located. Without careful planning, remote leaders find themselves in an uncomfortable environment where they aren’t forming good relationships with […]

Source: Team Tech Assessment for Project Managers | Remote Leadership Institute

Think People Don’t Really Matter?

Simply put, life goes better when humans we encounter are seen as people… again, seen as PEOPLE. This is underscored by current events, especially lately. In my experience thus far as a Project Manager, seeing people as people is key to successfully managing projects. I’m excited about the next speaker at PMI Central Indiana Chapter (PMICIC) because the topic is “People Matter: Know Your Talent”.

Being a member of Project Management Institute (PMI) and my journey to Project Management Professional certification has given me tools to work with that I frankly didn’t previously know existed. The PMBOK provides a detailed road map to help navigate any project. It doesn’t mean you take every route possible to get to your destination, but it’s really nice to have lots of options. Repeatedly throughout my studies and my interactions with PMI, it has been emphasized that Project Management is mostly about communication – and that’s means it’s about people. One can have the most technically correct and functional plan – but without people understanding it and engaging the plan… it’s incomplete.

I love being a member of a local chapter of PMI (PMICIC). When I think of my chapter, a word picture comes to my mind. PMI is a phenomenally recognized global organization and the PMBOK is a very technical road map, however PMICIC puts “skin” on all that for me. PMI majors in contemporary uses for tried and tested tools for any PM challenge. However, PMICIC adds the “people” part for me. I always learn a lot – and I can network with a host of local professionals – who’ve done this stuff in a context I can grasp and apply practically. And that’s real value, in my view.

Needless to say, I’m very happy that Ellen Decker will be speaking on July 20 for PMICIC’s monthly dinner. Her topic is “People Matter: Know Your Talent” and I’m looking forward to a powerful presentation that will help put “skin” on Project tools. Visit pmicic.org to learn about the dinner and much more about this powerful organization. If you are thinking about PMI, just do it. It’s worth it. And plug into a local chapter if at all possible. I really think you will be glad you did!